COVID-19

Work, Wellbeing, and Coping Behavior in the Time of Covid-19: A Longitudinal Study

A longitudinal study was started in December 2019 to investigate, using monthly data collections from a large national sample in Germany, how the COVID-19 pandemic changes people’s work arrangements, wellbeing, and behavior.

COVID-19 and the Workplace: Implications, Issues, and Insights for Future Research and Action

The impacts of COVID-19 on workers and workplaces across the globe have been dramatic. This broad review of prior research rooted in work and organizational psychology, and related fields, is intended to make sense of the implications for employees, teams, and work organizations.

Individual Differences and Changes in Subjective Wellbeing During the Early Stages of the COVID-19 Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has considerably impacted many people’s lives. This study examined changes in subjective wellbeing between December 2019 and May 2020 and how stress appraisals and coping strategies relate to individual differences and changes in subjective wellbeing during the early stages of the pandemic.

Pandemics: Implications for Research and Practice in Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Pandemics have historically shaped the world of work in various ways. With COVID-19presenting as a global pandemic, there is much speculation about the impact that this crisis will have for the future of work and for people working in organizations.

COVID-19 and Careers: On the Futility of Generational Explanations

It is common to broadly group people of different ages into “generations” and to speak of distinctions between such groups in terms of “generational differences.” The problem with this practice, is that there exists no credible scientific evidence that (a) generations exist, (b) that people can be reliably classified into generational groups, and (c) that there are demonstrable differences between such groups.

“The COVID-19 Generation”: A Cautionary Note

With COVID-19 presenting as a global pandemic, we have noticed an emerging rhetoric concerning “the COVID- 19 Generation,” both anecdotally and across various media outlets.